Day 1 2 Background 2.1 Cosmology 2.1.12 Student Overview Day 2

Planets


Mercury ] Venus ] Mars ] Jupiter ] Saturn ] Uranus ] Neptune ] Pluto ] 


Venus is one of the brightest objects in our sky, so it is clearly visible to the naked eye. It can be tricky to spot, however, because it is always near the Sun. It rises and sets with the Sun each day. Ancient civilizations believed Venus was actually two different objects, so they called the one that rose the Morning Star, and the one that sets the Evening Star.


Basic Facts

Venus

Earth

Position from the Sun

2

3

Diameter

7,521 miles (12,104 km)

7,926 miles (12,753 km)

Moons

0

1

Rings

0

0

Average Distance from Sun

67,000,000 miles (108,000,000 km)

93,000,000 miles (149,000,000 km)

Your Weight on the Planet

Multiply your weight by 0.91

Multiply your weight by 1.0

Length of One Year

225 Earth days

365 Earth days

Length of One Day

243 Earth days

1 Earth day

What’s in the Atmosphere?

Carbon dioxide, nitrogen

Nitrogen, oxygen

Temperature

860ºF (460ºC)

-128ºF to 136ºF

(-89ºC to 58ºC)


Discovery

Since Venus can be seen with the naked eye, no one really knows who discovered Venus. Venus’ beautiful color made it easy for ancient astronomers to find it in the night sky long before the invention of the telescope.


Missions to Venus

Mission

Launch Date(s)

Mission Accomplishments

Venera Missions (USSR)

1961 to 1983

First probe to enter Venus’ atmosphere. First successful landing of a spacecraft on another planet. Transmitted first black and white pictures of the planet's surface.

Mariner Missions (USA)

1962 to 1973

Took pictures of Venus’ atmosphere.

Pioneer Missions (USA)

1978

First spacecraft to use radar to map Venus’ surface.

Vega Missions (USSR)

1984

Conducted soil experiments.

Galileo (USA and Europe)

1989

Images of Venus. Used Venus to pick up speed on its way to Jupiter.

Magellan (USA)

1989

Mapped Venus.


Interesting Facts About Venus


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